How You Learn from Experience and Shape What Happens Next

Often overlooked in the our practices as managers, program designers and leaders is the processes of how we learn from experiences. Utilizing the David Kolb Learning Cycle, this seminar exposes participants to the theory and practice of this approach, and provides them with practical tools for facilitating supporting staff and participants in growth. This will be a hands on and collaborative seminar.

Heather Wolfson is the Chief Operating Officer at M²: The Institute for Experiential Jewish Education. She’s worked in the Jewish communal field for nearly 15 years, including most recently as the Chief Program Officer for the Jewish Federation of San Diego County. Heather holds an MBA in Management from Loyola Marymount University, undergraduate degrees from the University of Arizona in Journalism and Communication, and a certificate in Experiential Jewish Education. She lives in San Diego with her husband and two sons.

M² is dedicated to advancing experiential Jewish education – a field dedicated to the development of individual and communal Jewish identity and agency. More information can be found at ieje.org.

Social Media 101: Representing Your Organization

Have you already dipped into the Social Media sphere? Are you nervous to start? Maybe you’re having trouble finding good content or shooting. Join Leichtag Foundation’s Communications Associate, Jordan Daniels, as he gives us some tips and tricks representing our organizations on Social Media. In this interactive workshop, he’ll cover some best practices, resources for content and include a phone-tography demonstration for everyone to create a fun post for their organization!

Please be sure to bring a full charged phone, as there are interactive demonstrations.

Donor Prospecting for Greater Giving

Join us to learn the strategies and techniques proven successful for identifying and cultivating donor prospects for your nonprofit. This workshop has something for everyone including those new to fundraising as well as those with extensive experience.  Volunteers and board members are also welcome.  You’ll leave with a clear plan of action to turn prospects into donors.

Sharyn Goodson is the Leichtag Foundation’s Vice President of Philanthropy, where she manages Foundation grantmaking and its philanthropic consulting practice, leads funder partnerships, and develops giving opportunities for community members.  Sharyn has worked for the Leichtag Foundation since 2010 and also managed philanthropy programs for the Jewish Community Foundation of San Diego, with her most recent role there as Vice President of Philanthropy.  Previously, Sharyn served as Director of Grants of Jewish Family Service of San Diego and Program Director of the Aspen Community Foundation in Aspen, CO.

Your Mission in 60 Seconds


How do we communicate what we’re about in a clear and concise manner? In this workshop, attendees discover the essence of their organizations’ missions and personal narratives. Once these stories are identified, we shape them into 60 second pitches. This session focuses on both the content of the pitch and the manner in which it is presented, with feedback and guidance offered.

Key takeaways:

  • A 60 second pitch of your personal and/or organizational mission
  • Techniques for getting to the heart of any story or mission quickly and clearly
  • Public speaking skills and techniques
  • Models for giving progressive feedback

Schedule:

3:00-4:30pm Your Mission in 60 Seconds

4:30-5:00pm Refreshments and Networking 

Meet the Facilitator: Aaron Henne

Aaron Henne is the Artistic Director of theatre dybbuk, an organization whose work illuminates universal human experience from a Jewish perspective. In addition to his work with theatre dybbuk, Aaron teaches storytelling workshops throughout the country and has designed and facilitated creative seminars for Lucasfilm, Pixar, and Dreamworks. He was an American Jewish University Dream Lab Fellow and the Diane Luboff Scholar at the Cutter Colloquium at HUC-JIR. Aaron has also served as a professional mentor at Otis College of Art and Design, as faculty for the Wexner Heritage Program, and as a consultant and facilitator for a wide variety of organizations including the Lainer School, The Jewish Federations of North America’s National Young Leadership Cabinet, and the Western Hillel Organization regional conference. In addition, Mr. Henne is a board member for the Alliance For Jewish Theatre, a Wexner Field Fellow, and the recipient of LA Weekly and SF Bay Area Theatre Critics Circle Awards for Playwriting.

Preparing for the High Holy Days: A Jewish Meditation Workshop for Selichot


Typically held late in the night on the Saturday evening before Rosh Hashanah, Selichot offers an opportunity to prepare ourselves for the Days of Awe and begin the process of introspection, reflection, and transformation. The days leading up to Rosh Hashanah, the birthday of the world, and Yom Kippur, the day of at-one-ment, are a time for reflection and returning (teshuva). We practice returning to ourselves, our best selves, each other, holiness. Through prayer and practice, we can use the holidays to rededicate ourselves to create peace and justice in our lives and in the world. Join us for a two-hour workshop where we will press pause on our busy-ness, practice being fully present, and use Jewish meditation practices, including writing meditation, to reflect on the past year, look forward, and prepare for the High Holy Days in a deep and meaningful way. Open to total beginners and experienced meditators, tickets available on Eventbrite.


Alison Laichter is a meditation teacher, consultant, urban planner, and former Brooklynite, now based in Southern California. She founded and directed the Jewish Meditation Center (JMC) in NYC, was a recipient of the Joshua Venture Group Dual Investment Program, a two year and $100k fellowship for social entrepreneurs, and was named one of the Jewish Week’s “36 Under 36: Visionaries for a New Era.” Alison teaches meditation all over the world, including at schools, museums, retreat centers, synagogues, JCCs, hospitals, festivals, and conferences, all with the intention and understanding that truly sustainable repair of the world happens from the inside out. Alison loves working with individuals and communities to create inclusive, accessible, and radically amazing experiences.

Growth and Leadership: A Q&A with Moishe House CEO David Cygielman

Image taken from Moishe House Website

David Cygielman conceived Moishe House over Shabbat with friends when they realized that there was a lack of cultural and personal engagement between young Jews navigating adulthood. What began as one Shabbat dinner in a home in Oakland, CA in 2006 became a network of homes around the world that provides over 60,000 Jews with chances to engage in their communities through programs, education and fun every year.

Moishe House continues to thrive and their decision to move their headquarters to The Hive in 2013 has inspired our co-working community, added vibrancy to local Jewish life for young adults, and attracted hundreds of Jews in their 20s and 30s to North San Diego County for leadership retreats. While visiting HQ a couple weeks ago, David gave us the opportunity to catch up with him about Moishe House’s growth, his vision for the future and his recent  article in eJewish Philanthropy.

Has Moishe House grown in the way you envisioned?

Originally the vision for Moishe House was just the houses. I thought that we could, at our best, grow to 50 houses. I thought that we’d probably need to raise a certain amount of funds to support that number each year and I thought that was a long ways away. But we quickly grew to 35 houses, then 40 houses, and I realized that there could be a lot more. There were so many cities that we didn’t think could have more than one house, or one at all, and then they did successfully. Then the concept expanded internationally and all these programs beyond Moishe House grew – Moishe House without Walls, Camp Nai Nai Nai and our Jewish Learning Retreats. You turn around and there’s 108 houses in 26 countries. It’s far surpassed what the initial vision was.

What was the moment that you realized Moishe House was going to be more than what you thought it could be?

The moment we started getting applications from other countries showed us that word was spreading fast and demand outweighed our current supply. We quickly realized, “If we could say ‘Yes’ to these people then we could grow very fast.”

Your article in eJewishPhilanthropy talks about “investing in leaders.” How does Moishe House invest in leaders?

It’s beyond theory, it’s practice. We let the hosts and residents lead. They are in charge of building, operating and running their Jewish community. Through initiatives like The Open Dor Project, we also provide financial resources and consulting. But the best way to grow a leader is to give them the chance to lead and then support them and their success. By turning over the reins to hosts and residents, we enable them to learn all the aspects of leadership by practicing it.

What does the future of Jewish leadership look like to you?

I like the question, but what I think about more is what Jewish followership looks like. There are lots of Jewish leaders, but they aren’t leading in the Jewish community. Will the generation of Jewish leaders who have funded, built and led current institutions be willing and able to follow younger leaders? If they are, I think .

We need to figure out how to build strong followers who won’t pull their participation because a Jewish institution took a risk and it didn’t work out. We need followers who will stay on board to support young leaders that they believe will be successful.

In your article and the talk you gave to Hive members, you mentioned the idea of “stretch projects,” and how providing them invests in leadership. Would you mind elaborating what that looks like?

It’s giving someone the tools to run with and own a project outside the walls of your job. For example, if you worked at Moishe House and asked me what I thought about opening an LGBTQ or Jew of Color-specific Moishe House, I’d rather say back to you, “How do you feel about it?” If you feel like we need one then giving you a stretch project would mean saying, “Okay! Let’s see if we can make that happen,” and letting you explore and start the project. It’s about following you taking on this project and supporting you however we can.

What do you want to see next in Moishe House?

I want to see us have over 200 houses! I want us to have a big R&D department to innovate new ideas. I would like to see a laboratory more than an organization. There are a lot of young adults out there that aren’t engaged in classical ways but could be in others, and there’s so much more we can do with Moishe House.

Sunset & Havdalah

Please join us for a sunset picnic and Havdalah at the most beautiful lookout point on Leichtag commons. There will be song, drink, dessert, and discussion to help wrap up Shabbat and glide into the new week. The event will be hosted and facilitated by the returning Jewish Food Justice Fellows, a group of passionate food and environmental professionals, who spent a year and a half in the early days of the Leichtag Commons working on developing programming and building community.

6:30 Bring your own favorite meal to close out Shabbat

7:30 Havdalah Service

8:00 Wine, dessert and fireside singing

Building Strong Relationships for Donor Retention

Where does your organization focus most of its fundraising energy? Chances are, the answer is getting more donors. But what about keeping your current donors?

Research shows that nearly three out of every four new nonprofit donors leave an organization and never come back. This has led many in the field to focus less on acquiring new supporters and more on nurturing the relationships that they already have.

Join us for this 90-minute, interactive workshop where we will explore:

  • Why organizations lose donors and money
    · How keeping donors increases fundraising success
    · Opportunities to build donor relationships
    · Elements of a successful donor retention plan

Light breakfast will be served.

Sharyn Goodson is Leichtag Foundation’s Director of Philanthropic Strategy and currently serves on the board of San Diego Grantmakers. Sharyn’s professional experience includes managing the Jewish Community Foundation of San Diego’s philanthropy programs, both serving as the lead contact for major family funds and foundations and as Vice President of Philanthropy. Previously, Sharyn served as Director of Grants of Jewish Family Service of San Diego as well as Program Director of the Aspen Community Foundation in Aspen, CO.

**The contents of the workshop and associated materials are intended to provide helpful and useful material on the subjects addressed in the workshop. By participating in this workshop, participants agree that Leichtag Foundation and its subsidiaries will be held harmless by the participants and its sponsoring organizations.

The Hive Presents theatre dybbuk’s “lost tribes”

DESCRIPTION

Inspired by the stories of the lost tribes of Israel, theatre dybbuk presents a full-length theatrical work, rich in movement, original music, and lyrical language that relates ancient mythological and tribal narratives to contemporary questions of integration, appropriation, and belonging.

THE SHOW

In the early eighth century BCE, the Neo-Assyrian Empire conquered the Northern Kingdom of Israel, from whence it has been said that ten of the twelve ancient tribes of Israel were deported and assimilated. These tribes are now lost to history, with a variety of folktales, legends, and theories about their fates having come about since that time. Some are told from the point of view of those who regard themselves as members of a lost tribe, while others are told from an outside perspective in order to make a case for self-serving outcomes.

Framed in the context of a gallery exhibition, “lost tribes” weaves together stories from the Assyrian conquest to the present day, tracing a world history of assimilation and dominance; of cultural conquest, annihilation, and survival. The performance incorporates choreography by Kai Hazelwood, production design by Leslie K. Gray, and a live percussion score composed by Michael Skloff, created in collaboration with Emilia Moscoso Borja and Alex Shaw. The production is written and directed by theatre dybbuk’s artistic director, Aaron Henne, and developed with the ensemble.

The Hive Presents theatre dybbuk’s “lost tribes”

DESCRIPTION

Inspired by the stories of the lost tribes of Israel, theatre dybbuk presents a full-length theatrical work, rich in movement, original music, and lyrical language that relates ancient mythological and tribal narratives to contemporary questions of integration, appropriation, and belonging.

THE SHOW

In the early eighth century BCE, the Neo-Assyrian Empire conquered the Northern Kingdom of Israel, from whence it has been said that ten of the twelve ancient tribes of Israel were deported and assimilated. These tribes are now lost to history, with a variety of folktales, legends, and theories about their fates having come about since that time. Some are told from the point of view of those who regard themselves as members of a lost tribe, while others are told from an outside perspective in order to make a case for self-serving outcomes.

Framed in the context of a gallery exhibition, “lost tribes” weaves together stories from the Assyrian conquest to the present day, tracing a world history of assimilation and dominance; of cultural conquest, annihilation, and survival. The performance incorporates choreography by Kai Hazelwood, production design by Leslie K. Gray, and a live percussion score composed by Michael Skloff, created in collaboration with Emilia Moscoso Borja and Alex Shaw. The production is written and directed by theatre dybbuk’s artistic director, Aaron Henne, and developed with the ensemble.